National POW/MIA Recognition Day

National POW/MIA Recognition Day began in 1998 to remind us of our service members who are still missing and recognize those who were prisoners of war. This day lands on the third Friday of September each year. Currently, there are more than 82,000 missing Americans, most of whom were lost during World War II.

From DPAA: As this map shows, at present, more than 82,000 Americans remain missing from WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and the Gulf Wars/other conflicts. Out of the 82,000 missing, 75% of the losses are located in the Asia-Pacific, and over 41,000 of the missing are presumed lost at sea (i.e. ship losses, known aircraft water losses, etc.). *Reflects actual number still unaccounted-for. PMKOR database count is slightly higher due to several entries pending administrative review. *As part of DPAA’s data consolidation effort we have validated the number of missing from WWII. This new figure reflects the elimination of duplicative records, erroneous entries, and information that demonstrates the individual was properly accounted for by the appropriate authorities before our Agency inherited those responsibilities. (Click on the image to visit the DPAA’s page with this graphic in a larger format.)

The U.S. Government’s Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is working to find and identify the remains of missing Americans all around the globe. So far, 146 missing personnel have been accounted for this year. Privately, organizations such as Pacific Wrecks and The Bent Prop Project are also working towards the same goal.

Take some time to remember those who are still missing or were POWs and reread some of their stories. They will not be forgotten.

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